Bokashi

Improving Soil Moisture Retention

Posted by Eric Lancaster on

Organic Means of Preserving Soil Moisture Soil water is the lifeblood of your crops. Properly hydrated soil regulates ground temperatures for reliable flowering and seed germination, helps sensitive plants survive the summer months, provides structure, and encourages the growth of crop-friendly organisms. Without proper care, however, soil can lose its water retention; even generous rainfall is lost, quickly sinking into the water table without efficiently benefiting the plants above. Organic farmers and gardeners have two excellent tools at their disposal for reversing these effects. Organic Matter One of the best ways to improve damaged soil is by introducing healthy soil. Organic food...

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Going Green with Local Farming

Posted by Eric Lancaster on

The Global Impact of the "Buy Local" Movement We have all heard of the "buy local" movement but why should we all be buying locally grown produce? Although irresponsible farming methods like improper soil management and irrigation have negative environmental impacts, far more environmental damage comes from the transportation of crops. Buying organic farming goods from within your community simultaneously strengthens both your community and the environment. Locally grown produce helps preserve the local landscape. When buying fruits and veggies from local farmers, money they receive allows them to maintain their land without the need for selling pieces to land developers. In...

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Differences in Soil pH

Posted by Eric Lancaster on

Differences in Soil pH

Many of us are familiar with the general pH designations of acidic and basic when it comes to general science. What some of us might not know is how pH levels can drastically affect the health of plants and vegetation. The optimum range for most vegetation is between 5.5 and 7.0 on the Hydrogen scale, but plants can survive on both ends of the pH spectrum. Let’s review the differences between the two and discuss what sort of nutrients are present in each type of soil.Plants need nutrients to grow. Nutrients needed in higher concentrations are called macronutrients and include...

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Start a Red Worm Farm - Let Worms Do Your Dirty Work!

Posted by Eric Lancaster on

What is a Worm Farm & How Can I Use Worms for Composting?Worm farming, also known as vermiculture, is a method of utilizing worms for composting foods and other organic materials to create nutrient rich fertilizers or hummus. When worms eat the organic materials they excrete waste that is rich in fertile nutrients essential for a healthy garden. Vermiculture is different from most aerobic composting because it can be done inside and it produces a higher quality fertilizer than traditional kitchen composting methods. How do I Raise Worms? Getting Started with Worm FarmingAll successful worm farms start with a good worm bin. You...

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How To Compost Using Bokashi

Posted by Eric Lancaster on

Bokashi composting has a number of benefits, including almost no odor (the material has its own smell, but it is not like a rotten smell), limited use of space, and it’s one of the quickest composting methods. Another huge benefit of Bokashi composting is the simple, straight-forward process. It’s faster and requires less work, which is always an advantage. In fact, Bokashi composting can be broken down into three very simple steps: 1. Fill an airtight bucket with food waste and layer with EM-1 Bokashi branCollecting food waste is standard in any food composting method, but in the bokashi method,...

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